Learning Techniques and Impact

A distinguishing feature of Global Leadership 2030 is the use of immersion learning techniques (action learning projects and experiential learning) as a catalyst for transformation. Participants are immersed in cultures that have significantly changed global business today.

Immersion Learning and Action Learning Projects

A distinguishing feature of Global Leadership 2030 is the use of immersion learning techniques as a catalyst for transformation. Participants are immersed in cultures that have significantly changed global business today. For example, the India module includes field trips to explore the society, culture, economy, and infrastructure of rural and urban areas and the vibrancy that is uniquely India. A day-long visit to a village allows participants to:

• Gain insight into the fabric of Indian village life
• Learn about the civil society and administration of rural India
• Understand the values, lifestyle, beliefs, concerns, and aspirations of the local people
• Acquire an inside-out view of rural India—healthcare and education; families and households; traditional occupations and industry; trade and commerce; the role of women; the aspirations of the young people
• Identify the role of political parties, NGOs, self-help groups, and social entrepreneurs
• Gather inputs for a SWOT analysis of doing business in rural India

Image of Bullock cart in southern India

(Click image to view the entire Global Leadership photo gallery from Chennai, India, 2011.)

The immersion learning experiences in India and China include visits to local businesses and sites.  Participants also have the opportunity to talk with senior executives working in the country, community leaders, and political officials.


Bolstering the Team through Action Learning Projects

Team-based, hands-on, action learning projects are at the heart of the Global Leadership 2030 learning experience. These projects require teams to develop innovative approaches to their own global challenges through cross-functional, cross-business, and cross-border collaboration. This process is one of the most valuable program components, enhancing participants’ ability to build a stronger, more team-focused organization.


Impact

Both learning techniques – immersion learning and action learning projects – have a significant impact on achieving breakthrough results. Consortium members assess impact within their companies in different ways. At Colgate-Palmolive, for example, the program is an important part of the company’s retention strategy, sending a signal to key high potentials and used as a stepping-stone to the global assignments necessary for advancement to the highest levels. From 1999 to 2009, the retention rate of program alumni was 91 percent, with 72 out of the 79 participating executives still with their organizations.

Corning surveys participants and their sponsors (their managers) about program impact after each offering. Every year, sponsors and participants have ranked perceived value to the corporation at or near the highest level.

Deere prides itself on selecting high-potential employees for the program and seeing them live up to the company’s expectations. A key metric for Deere is how many positions of major responsibility are filled by graduates. Seventy to 75 percent of their GL2030 alumni are in the global officer group.

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